Conversations With Friends

Conversations With Friends

A Novel

Book - 2017
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"[A] cult-hit . . . [a] sharply realistic comedy of adultery and friendship."-- Entertainment Weekly

WINNER OF THE SUNDAY TIMES (UK) YOUNG WRITER OF THE YEAR AWARD * NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY VOGUE AND SLATE AND ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY BUZZFEED AND ELLE

Frances is a coolheaded and darkly observant young woman, vaguely pursuing a career in writing while studying in Dublin. Her best friend is the beautiful and endlessly self-possessed Bobbi. At a local poetry performance one night, they meet a well-known photographer, and as the girls are then gradually drawn into her world, Frances is reluctantly impressed by the older woman's sophisticated home and handsome husband, Nick. But however amusing Frances and Nick's flirtation seems at first, it begins to give way to a strange--and then painful--intimacy.

Written with gemlike precision and marked by a sly sense of humor, Conversations with Friends is wonderfully alive to the pleasures and dangers of youth, and the messy edges of female friendship

SHORTLISTED FOR THE INTERNATIONAL DUBLIN LITERARY AWARD

"Sharp, funny, thought-provoking . . . a really great portrait of two young women as they're figuring out how to be adults." --Celeste Ng, "Late Night with Seth Meyers Podcast"

"The dialogue is superb, as are the insights about communicating in the age of electronic devices. Rooney has a magical ability to write scenes of such verisimilitude that even when little happens they're suspenseful." --Curtis Sittenfeld, The Week

"Rooney has the gift of imbuing everyday life with a sense of high stakes . . . a novel of delicious frictions." -- New York

"A writer of rare confidence, with a lucid, exacting style . . . One wonderful aspect of Rooney's consistently wonderful novel is the fierce clarity with which she examines the self-delusion that so often festers alongside presumed self-knowledge. . . . But Rooney's natural power is as a psychological portraitist. She is acute and sophisticated about the workings of innocence; the protagonist of this novel about growing up has no idea just how much of it she has left to do." --Alexandra Schwartz, The New Yorker

"This book. This book. I read it in one day. I hear I'm not alone." --Sarah Jessica Parker (Instagram)
Publisher: London : Hogarth, [2017]
Copyright Date: ©2017
ISBN: 9780451499059
9780451499066
Branch Call Number: FIC Roone
Characteristics: 309 pages ; 22 cm

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bette108
Sep 20, 2019

I agree with Walconus who writes a review on this book. The style of writing is deceptively easy yet the concepts and complications covered in this book are not. Personally, I really liked the ending of this book. Refrain from peaking so that you can savour the ending as a final bite of a fine meal.

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Waluconis
Jun 11, 2019

The New Yorker called this some of the first millennial literature. The style might seem bland at first, but if you stick with it, you see it is Frances telling the story, and that's her voice. The story is frustrating as the characters repeat the same "blunders and blinders" while they make they way through their relationships. There are mainly four characters, forming various shifting love triangles, which seem ultimately to be getting nowhere. This would be a great book for a college class or reading group that wants to discuss contemporary love relationships. It would provide a heated discussion. Frances, the chief protagonist, explores life on a philosophical level: "A certain peace had come to me and I wondered if it was God’s doing after all. Not that God existed in any material way but as a shared cultural practice so widespread that it cam to seem materially real." Frances does not have many of these times of peace in the novel, mainly because she is caught in the bindings of young love. In fact, she seems to really love two people. I would like to know what happens when Frances matures. The cover, with its painting by Alex Katz, seemed perfectly acceptable as representations of Frances and Bobbi. I'd give this novel another half star because it is Sally Rooney's second published. I'll look for and read her next one.

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baldma
Jun 07, 2019

An interesting and engaging book told by a 21 year old narrator. Cool,wry and smooth, honest, arid humour and reckless despair The "delicate cruelties of human interaction". Francis is a bisexual communist student , allergic to expressing emotion having a relationship with a married man.

k
KadenceB
Apr 28, 2019

I liked the style of writing! Made it a quick read, I sped through this in one train ride

g
GAYATHRIR1
Apr 20, 2019

“first great millennial novelist for her stories of love and late capitalism”, as per NYer

b
blcwrites
Mar 14, 2019

While so many readers loved this book, my returning thoughts along the way- what? I almost put it down, hoping it would get better, but for me - it never did go deep enough into the characters motivations to leave me with a can't wait for the next one.

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MaryJoSchifsky
Jan 29, 2019

New Yorker interview with Sally Rooney Jan 7 2019

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salsa25
Jan 27, 2019

I love how she writes. The no quotation marks may turn people off, but it forces you to absorb every word, every sentence. I felt I was wholly engaged with the nuances of their interpersonal relationships. Loved this book

c
Candaceb108
Jan 20, 2019

Every young person who reads this is going to think it is only about their age group. In some ways it is, when their parents were this age, there was a much greater societal pressure to get your ass in gear and earn a living wage. But as far as the relationships are concerned, at 70, I can say, things are not that different. Reading it at my age, I can remember the stupidly wasteful way I treated relationships just because I was insecure, like the protagonist is.

The wonderful thing is the way it ends. Relationships are messy, we need rules, but rules are stupid too.

k
KatG1983
Dec 31, 2018

Honestly, could not get past page 40.

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vickiz
Jul 03, 2017

Lights sparkled on the river and buses ran past like boxes of light, carrying faces in the windows.

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