The last sentence

The last sentence

Streaming Video - 2014 | Swedish
Average Rating:
3
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Set against the backdrop of WWII, The Last Sentence is based on the life of crusading journalist Torgny Segerstedt, editor-in-chief of one of Sweden's leading newspapers, highlighting his one-man battle against Nazism and his country's policy of appeasement to Hitler.
Audience: NRT
Publisher: Made available through hoopla, 2014.
[United States] : Music Box Films, 2014.
Characteristics: data file
digital
1 online resource (1 video file (approximately 126 min.)) : sound, color

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a
akirakato
Jan 13, 2016

This is a 2012 documentary about the life and career of Torgny Segerstedt, a Swedish newspaper editor who was a prominent critic of Hitler and the Nazis during a period when the Swedish government and monarch were intent on maintaining Sweden's neutrality and avoiding tensions with Germany.
Except for some war footages, there are no dramatic scenes in the film, which is rather boring.

@ voisjoe1_0
Well written comment.
I am about to watch the film and you have made it something that I am really looking forward to.
Thanks

v
voisjoe1_0
Dec 25, 2014

For ten years, Swedish newspaper editor Torgny Segersted warned Scandinavians about the dangers and evils of Adolph Hitler. For this, he was a hero to millions (although the Swedish government did everything to avoid angering Hitler). Director, Jan Troell, was intrigued by this, but what he was more fascinated by were Segersted’s mostly secret private sins and guilt. During pre-filming research, the director discovered a pot of gold as he and the script-writers explored archives and interviewed witnesses to produce a truly 3-D version of this “hero.” So not only is the film the story about a hero who fought evil, it was the story of a disgusting man twisted and haunted by his own guilty conscience. In the film, Sergersted's inner horrors appeared to him in the guise of funereal black-dressed dead women that were witnesses and/or accomplices to his sins. Shot in black-and-white, the film melds archival news clips demonstrating the great popularity of the non-Jewish crowds that adored Hitler. Hitler’s backers were exhilerated, but his future victims were aghast as their extermination was just around the corner. Kinda’ like the KKK that were saviors to America's Southern Whites, but meant 100 years of death and terror to Southern Blacks after the Civil War.

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