The Vision

The Vision

Vol. 1, Little Worse Than A Man

Book - 2016
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The Vision wants to be human, and what's more human than family? So he heads back to the beginning, to the laboratory where Ultron created him and molded him into a weapon. The place where he first rebelled against his given destiny and imagined that he could be more -that he could be a man. There, he builds them. A wife, Virginia. Two teenage twins, Viv and Vin. They look like him. They have his powers. They share his grandest ambition -or is that obsession? -the unrelenting need to be ordinary. Behold the Visions!

COLLECTING: VISION 1-6

Publisher: New York : Marvel Worldwide, Inc., [2016]
Copyright Date: ©2016
ISBN: 9780785196570
Branch Call Number: YA King
Characteristics: 1 volume (unpaged) : chiefly colour illustrations ; 26 cm
Alternative Title: Little worse than a man

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VaughanPLShelly Mar 11, 2017

The Vision doesn't read like a superhero comic in the best way. With great writing and a compelling mystery, it's accessible to every reader. It's not surprising to see why it was named the best comic of 2016 by so many.


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ArapahoeLesley Feb 08, 2018

What a surprise! The only 'super hero' comic I read is Ms. Marvel because it is about being young in society. This one has similar themes, what it means to be human, acceptance and regret etc... It's also funny!! Great!

ArapahoeChrisP Jan 12, 2018

Vision moves to the suburbs. A little unsettling in parts. Overall pretty good!

LoganLib_Kirra Nov 29, 2017

The first collection of The Vision comics (#1-6) introduces us to a seemingly perfect family in a suburb with a loving couple with their two happy children but it's anything but that with trouble from the very first page. I was really impressed with how creepy and ominous this story was and it was set up through dark, compelling illustration and rapidly strained conversation and internal monologues. We get the pleasure of watching as this family moves in their suburban home hoping for the best and getting the worst.

c
Citizen92116
Apr 06, 2017

This was my first foray into the Avengers world and, although I didn't need all the back story, it would've helped in the likability of these characters and give some insight into their motives.

The artwork is beautiful and elicits the tone of the scenes well.

IMO volume one and two should be read together.

The story can be moody and anxious and touches on despair, assimilation, and revenge.
Although the emotions involved could be considered heavy for a comic, I didn't think they were handled very sophisticatedly.
Some emotions, such as despair, are hard to convey with gravity in a story style such as this without dedicating more page space.

I also struggled with the motives with many of the characters.
Normally I can just accept what the character is set to do and then follow them along for the ride but I often found myself questioning if it made sense - e.g. why a phasing artificial intelligent being would even bother with the inefficiencies of daily domestic human life.
But I may not have been in the proper headspace for most of the first volume or where more back story would probably be helpful.

VaughanPLShelly Mar 11, 2017

The Vision doesn't read like a superhero comic in the best way. With great writing and a compelling mystery, it's accessible to every reader. It's not surprising to see why it was named the best comic of 2016 by so many.

forbesrachel Feb 01, 2017

The Vision is truly worthy of all the praise it has been receiving. Because it uses one of the lesser known superheroes, it isn't as tied up with continuity issues, and therefore has the freedom to do something unique. At first the Vision reads like a simple suburban American family story; the Vision, his wife Virginia, and their twin children Viv and Vin, have just moved to a nice neighbourhood in pleasant town, and their desire is just to live a normal life. They have a lot to learn about humanity, as they are synthezoids, but they are hopeful that they can. Their downfall lies in the fact that they have not had the experience of coping with unexpected situations and interactions with others. This leaves them vulnerable to anxiety, sadness, and other negative emotions. Each breaks in their own way as unfortunate events compound upon one another. The story, tone, even the art, slowly attain a horror vibe. This culminates in one final terrifying realization as the narrator explains P versus NP. The Vision's central question, "what would you do for your family", has been looked at before in comics, but never like this. The actions of the Visions resonate with us, but they also scare us because their bad actions are done for good reasons, and we are forced to wonder if we would do otherwise.

k
Keogh
Dec 28, 2016

Unsettling at times, but an interesting read. Longtime Avenger Vision, in a quest to be more human, creates a family for himself in the suburbs- and then of course things start to go wrong in this first volume.

mvkramer Dec 26, 2016

This books doesn't go at all how I expected. Vision decides to make himself an android family and live in suburbia. Despite the smiley happy cover, this is played for drama, and occasionally a sort of low-key horror. What measure is a man? Read this, and then think about it.

s
SecretWalrus
Dec 18, 2016

This book is as good as any graphic novel I have ever read - and I have read a lot.

d
duane767
Dec 10, 2016

The sadness about a series like this is that it will fly under the radar because the Vision is not seen as a big time hero and the idea of him having a family might even seem much more less than attractive for the average person to read. But if you like comics that ask deep questions and have a lot more to them than you would have originally thought, please read this. You will be drawn into something totally and unexpectedly splendid.

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c
Citizen92116
Apr 06, 2017

Citizen92116 thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 13 and 43

Mark_Daly Aug 26, 2016

Mark_Daly thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

Notices

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mvkramer Dec 26, 2016

Violence: A human violently attacks an android child and gets beaten to death for his trouble.

Mark_Daly Aug 26, 2016

Violence: A few explicit scenes of violence to animals, humans and synthezoids.

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